Role-playing 302: Personal Development Through Role-playing

Previously in this series, I have discussed how role-playing helps you build the skills required to work successfully as a team. Today’s article will touch upon this but will mostly be focussed on how role-playing can improve your workplace skills through personal development. As ever, I might return to this topic in the future, but for now this will do.

There are three primary areas of personal development that role-playing can help with; empathy, organisation and creativity.

Empathy synergises with the communication aspect I have discussed before but goes deeper. Empathy is the ability to understand, and feel, the emotions and experiences of others. To some extent it relies on imagination, but it also builds off of your own experiences.

In-game, empathy is developed through role-play. By the very nature of role-playing, your character will end up in situations that you have never encountered. Depending on how you approach character creation, your character may end up being wildly different to you anyway, further increasing your opportunities to build upon your ability to put yourself in the shoes of other people.

Out of game, this makes you a far more sympathetic (and empathetic) person. Because you understand more about how other people are feeling, you are able to relate to them better which helps you to build effective relationships with others far faster, and encourages your colleagues to place more confidence in you and your abilities.

Empathy in general is great as a tool for developing your communication skills because it can help make you aware of the effects of what you are saying and can help you realise how to alter your vocabulary and conversational tone to improve your relationships with others.

Organisation, much like in the previous article, is about keeping track of useful information. In this context, however, it is less about organisational methods, and more about memory and personal organisation.

A large amount of the organisation required in-game is related to the internalisation of rules and character abilities/history, even more so for the GM who has to keep track of plot points, background characters and the like. Whilst everyone has their own method for remembering these things, all of them improve memory skills, internalisation procedures and recall speed.

I feel I should point out that a lot of the memory skills involved are developed through repeatedly using the data, but they are transferable.

The final area of this article is one that I feel is important in every aspect of life but I’ll explain here how creativity can help you specifically in the workplace.

Role-playing, by its very nature, is an improvisation, a creative exercise. Through play, you’ll develop confidence in your ability to respond to unexpected situations, your ability to alter your role in a team as needed and your ability to solve problems, whilst also learning how you prefer to express yourself creatively.

Out of game, and specifically in the workplace, having confidence in all of these skills means that you are able to react to the shifting nature of the workplace, moving between teams smoothly, and knowing that you are able to solve problems by yourself if required. Creativity also lends itself to leading others and inspiration, making it an important leadership skill to possess.

As an outlet in, and of itself, creative exercise (writing, reading, painting etc.) is a fantastic way of coping with emotional problems and creating support groups to help you deal with anything you may not be able to face alone. Indulging yourself in this way means that you have a more positive outlook and are able to perform your duties better in the workplace.

The above is my brief overview of the benefits of role-playing for individuals in the workplace. If you have any thoughts on this, please let me know in the comments.

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