Category Archives: Bubbles

Battle Maps: The Pleasure Barge

The pleasure barge has yet to be finished, but is open to adventurers seeking shelter.

The middle deck, comprised mostly of a large ballroom and galley (in addition to an entrance hall), is ringed by a narrow gang-way that provides access to the ladder leading to the wheelhouse on the top of the barge. The crates here are full of furniture parts and ornamentation.

The bottom deck contains the engine room (complete with functioning boiler) and a yet to be installed spa/bath area. The crates on this deck are full of tiles and plumbing.

The top deck provides beds for special guests (as well as the master bedroom and attached vault) in addition to a mezzanine. Opening the crates on the top deck reveals more furniture parts and ornaments.


The map is designed to be printed on a single sheet of A4 paper with each square representing 10 feet. It was created in GIMP using assets from the Dunjinni Archive.

Pleasure Barge

Gaming with Anxiety

I’ve written about mental health on here before but this week I’m going to be addressing the subject of how anxiety affects me in a table-top context and how I cope with that.

If this isn’t something you want to read, or if it is something you find upsetting, feel free to click away from this page.

My anxiety in this context revolves around social matters, so experiencing it in the safe space of a table-top game actually helps me to develop coping mechanisms that allow me to deal with anxiety away from the game. Hopefully these methods can help you if you ever find yourself in a similar situation.

The primary result of my anxiety is the consistent feeling that I’ve been rude, or otherwise acted inappropriately. Typically this is because I think that I’ve spoken over someone, or that my actions in the game have worsened their experience.
The only way I’ve found to deal with this (in addition to the general one I will explain below) is to carefully think over what I’ve done that could have prompted this feeling. Usually, when I’m doing this, I realise that what I’m worrying about, in a previous situation, was not as bad as my mind tells me it is. I can then use that realisation to persuade myself that I haven’t done anything wrong, and that there is no reason for me to be upset, to varying degrees of success.

The other most common result is, if you pardon the phrase, performance anxiety, specifically that I messed up in my portrayal of my character, that I wasn’t true to previously established facts and behaviours.
For me, table-top role-playing games are all about the story and the role-playing, so when I feel like this, I worry that I have ruined the game for everyone else around the table. This is harder to ‘get over’ than the previous example but it is still possible to do so.
My main method for coping with this is to consider what actions I undertook in the session, and what I said, and incorporate them into the character. At the end of the day, everything I do in-character is an opportunity for character development and by considering what I’ve done, my character can change in unexpected ways.
I’ve also found that keeping an in-character journal helps with this.

The third result that I’m going to talk about today is that I worry about having held up the game, or that I have otherwise detracted from the experience for the person who is giving up their time to run it.
The only solution I have found to this is one that also helps with all of the above.

To wit, ask someone in the group, whether a player or the person running the game, whether you have done what you think that you have done. Hearing that you have no foundation for your worries from someone directly involved with them, in my experience, helps to assuage said worries.

Obviously, all of these coping mechanisms have a fluctuating level of results and sometimes don’t work as much as I would hope them to, but it is useful to still enact them to bring a little peace of mind.

I know this is a little short, but it isn’t an easy subject to talk about, so I hope this has helped you gain a little understanding into some of the effects of anxiety.

If you find my coping mechanisms useful, or have your own, please let me know in the comments.

Review: Dragon Age Roleplaying Game

Your humble author, a mere scribe in the service of the Chantry, was recently tasked with conducting an in-depth review of the impressive document compiled by the fine folk of the Green Ronin publishing house. This document, titled ‘Dragon Age Roleplaying Game Core Rulebook’, purports to be able to cover any eventuality that the peoples of Thedas may encounter in their everyday lives.

It is my hope that my examination, as presented here, will allow you to be able to draw your own conclusions regarding the veracity of this claim and the importance that the text places upon the heroes it strives to portray.

Presentation

The first noticeable thing upon opening the tome is the clarity of the text and the clear layout. Whilst this scribe has some niggles concerning the organisation of the work itself, for the most part it is a pleasure to read and to reference as needed.

Full colour art is lavishly displayed throughout and both chapter and heading breaks are clearly demarcated. There is little to say about the layout and general art design of the work, save that it is polished to a high degree and complements the paper stock.

The information contained with the book is well organised and excellently indexed leading to little time wasted when searching for relevant information. In many ways, the work mirrors that of the Chant of Light and with a little study could easily become as familiar a text among those who are required to know it.

Setting

The continent of Thedas is well documented, thanks in no small part to the tireless efforts of Brother Ferdinand Genitivi, and some of that information is reprinted here. While by no means presenting a detail analysis of the known world, the work presents a comprehensive overview of the peoples that make up our land, their cultures and some of the more prominent organisations.

Because of the easy availability of information concerning Thedas, I will say nothing else save that the information contained within will answer the vast majority of questions you may have.

Mechanics

In darkened rooms and smoky bars the continent over, it is possible to find groups of people engaged in a most peculiar activity. When conflicts become difficult to require resolution, Thedosians employ their own, unique method that I have been lead to believe is known as AGE, or the Adventure Game Engine. AGE refers to the principle of rolling three six-sided dice to resolve almost all problems. Depending on the numbers rolled, the ‘test’, as most problems are known, succeeds or fails, with some dice combinations resulting in so-called ‘Stunt Points’ that can be used to gain extra benefits.

Thedosians use the common six-sided dice for everything, applying and subtracting modifiers as necessary. This approach presents a simple, but streamlined, process to conflict resolution and one that is easily understood.

This humble author has been informed that, in practice, the three classes the work divides Thedosians, from every conceivable background, into work extremely well and present a wide variety of scope for an accurate representation of the people that inhabit Thedas, whether human, elf, dwarf or qunari.

For those concerned with such things, mages utilise a system they call ‘Mana Points’ to cast Circle-approved spells.  The document itself lists several non-approved spells, but this scribe was reassured that no-one would actually cast them.

Conclusions

Green Ronin’s work is an incredibly robust document that provides all the information needed to construct the lives of any number of Thedosians. Using their unique AGE mechanic, conflicts and tests of any kind can be resolved swiftly and simply, allowing more time to be spent enjoying Thedosian life and the experiences inherent within it.

Dungeon Maps: The Vault of the Shifting Sands

Over the past few weeks, I’ve been teaching myself the basics of GIMP, an open source alternative to Adobe’s Photoshop, in an effort to upskill myself (but mostly because I enjoy learning new things). Today I am happy to present the fruits of my labours!

I already know a few things I could do better and will probably make a few more maps until I am comfortable with layer masks, texture work and the like. As a first attempt though, I’m happy with what I’ve done. If you have any advice, please feel free to leave a comment.

A few notes; the .pngs on this page are full size and, if printed, should measure 1 inch to a square, as is standard for D&D battlemaps. If you use these maps in a digital campaign, each square measures 100px to a side. Room descriptions (including an array of traps and puzzles) and art credits can be found in the .pdf here.

This is primarily intended for 5th Edition Dungeons and Dragons, but you should be able to adapt it smoothly to any system.

Sans Comic: Belladonna Origins – Page Two

Panel 1

Description: A tall, narrow panel showing Isabelle from the front. Her coat is blown open by the wind, revealing a blazer and blouse above the dark jeans. An ID badge is clipped to the blazer’s breast pocket.

Text: A trained psychiatrist, Isabelle spends her days working in a council-funded clinic in the heart of the Hollow, offering psychiatric help for free.

 

Panel 2

Description: A square panel showing music playing in Isabelle’s coat pocket.

Text: –

 

Panel 3

Description: A square panel showing her pulling a mobile phone from her pocket, the caller ID reads ‘Mark’.

Text:-

 

Panel 4

Description: A square panel showing Isabelle’s face, frowning slightly.

Text: Sometimes though, her patients aren’t the only one with problems.

 

Panel 5

Description: A square panel shows Isabelle holding the phone to her ear.

Text: Isabelle; Mark. You know you aren’t supposed to call this number.

Mark; I know. But I wanted to hear your voice again.

Isabelle; Mark-

Mark; Please, I just want to talk.

 

 

 

The City of Scour

Following on from ‘The Twelve‘ is a guide to the city of Scour itself. For those who prefer such things, the .pdf can be found here.

Enjoy!

Role-playing 110 – Character Development

I’ve covered character improvement already, so now I’m going to talk a little about character development. The distinction, to me, is that the former is tied to the levelling mechanics of the game being played and the latter is tied to the narrative.

When entering the hobby, it is entirely okay for you to focus more on engaging with the game through a mechanical approach and learning the ropes before diving into the role-playing aspect of things. The D&D game that I’m typing up in the Actual Play section of this website remains focussed on the player characters and not their backstories for this very reason.
It is important that you feel comfortable with the game before increasing your engagement with it. As such, if you don’t feel able to deal with matters beyond what your character is currently experiencing, tell whoever is running the game. They’ll understand. There is a lot of trust needed around the game table, so to speak, and if one player isn’t comfortable with what they are doing, it will show and the game will suffer.

Assuming a certain level of comfort and familiarity with the game, then, how can you further develop character?

There are, as ever, a few ways to do this, and I shall try to explain them to the best of my ability.

The first method is the most obvious; through role-play. This is what you’ll find yourself doing through the course of play as your character reacts to the events of the game. You’ll find this method to be a constant drip of development as your character (guided by previously established facts of their personality) responds to the situations they find themselves in.
Something else to realise about this method of character development  is that other members of the party will play a large part in how your character develops. Inter-character relationships and interactions are a huge factor in how they will grow over the course of the game. Whilst you are under no compulsion to allow these things to impact your character, it’s generally better for group morale to follow them through to their end.
One of the most enjoyable things, in my experience, is to see how your character reacts when other party members put them in impossible situations.

The second method is tied to the first, but definitely separate; through play. As you play, you will discover what aspects of the game you like, and which ones your character feels like they thrive in. At the very least, you should have a good idea about which aspects of the game you would like your character to improve in.
Just by taking an interest in these aspects, you’ll be signifying to the person running the game that you want to see more of them and, all being well, they will likely plan on involving them more often. In this way, you should be having a self-directed manner of character development that evolves organically over the course of the game.

The third method is something that requires you to step out of the game and, as such, should only really be done when you are a) comfortable with doing so and b) when you are comfortable with whoever is running your game. The latter is important because this method requires you to talk to the GM about what you want for your character.
A lot of the time, this method will also involve clues and hooks you include in your character backstory.  If you are comfortable with leaving your character plans hidden in the backstory for your GM to uncover and elaborate upon, that is perfectly fine.
If you want something more, however, you need to arrange some way of talking privately to your GM. When you are able to do this, tell them what you think the future of your character could involve, what aspects of their personality you want to explore and whether or not you want anything else to happen. Really, if you get the chance to do this, you should tell them anything you want to regarding your character and the game, but I digress.
By telling them any of this, you are letting your GM know what you enjoy exploring and playing. As a result, they will hopefully try to incorporate more of it into the game.
One benefit of this method is that, in your discussion, the GM may suggest things about your character and their development that haven’t occurred to you but that you like. Another is that they may include things in the game that you’ve never thought of but which act as a good springboard for character development.
As a coda to this, you can also talk with your fellow players to discuss how their characters can help with the development of yours for roughly the same benefits.

Whatever you choose, it is important to remain comfortable with your choices.

These are only a few possible methods, of course, but hopefully they are informative. If you can think of any more, or have any other comments, let me know below.